Greetings,
June is an active time for both birds and bees, and we can make life easier for them by taking some simple steps. In the spirit of the season, here are some handy tips that make your home and garden (or balcony) more bird and bee-friendly.
Brooks Beaupain
206-778-4663 Direct
A Great Way to Prevent Bird Window Strikes

Whether home is an in-city condo or a mountain lodge, it's never fun to suddenly hear the dismal "thump" of a bird hitting a window.  (Researchers say that window strikes account for between 365 million to 988 million bird deaths per year in the U.S. alone!)

In addition to taking a big toll on bird populations, it's safe to say that the sight of a deceased bird underneath the window is not exactly something recommended by the "Better Homes and Gardens" curb appeal team.

Acopian Bird Savers to the Rescue

People give mixed reviews of bird deterrent window stickers and the sometimes funky-looking feather or foil string curtains, but here's the good news: A simple invention called Acopian Bird Savers has an extremely high success rate, looks good, and offers both a pre-made and an easy do-it-yourself option.

 

Bird Savers consist of 8-mil parachute cord attached to a horizontal cord or a thin vinyl strip that is easily found at hardware stores. Cords hang 4.25 inches apart, a narrow enough space to deflect even a hummingbird. Remarkably, even birds that don't see the cords have enough time to veer away as soon as the cords touch their wings - unlike window stickers, which are useless if the bird doesn't see them.

Users report success rates of 90% to 100%.  Here's more information at the Acopian Bird Savers website.




Bee-Friendly Garden Tips

Did you know that a bee can visit up to 5,000 flowers per day? Wild bee populations are in decline for a number of reasons, so now is a great time to create a bee-friendly environment. The good news is that even a window ledge or balcony flower box can be helpful!

What bee experts want you to know:

1. Plant flowers with single flower tops.

Simple, single-headed flowers make it easy for bees to reach pollen and nectar. It is much harder for them to penetrate double-headed flower tops, and many highly ornamental flowers contain little or no pollinator food.



2. Bees don't like red flowers.

Experts say that bees are attracted to blue, violet, purple, and white flowers, but the photoreceptors in their eyes cause red flowers to appear black.

3. Ask for plants that have not been treated with neonicotinoids.

A few years ago, researchers found that some big box stores were selling bee-friendly plant species that had been treated with high levels of neonicotinoids (neonics), the pesticide group that kills bees or causes them to suffer from deadly disorientation.

Home Depot and Lowes have pledged to phase out neonics by the end of 2018 and 2019, respectively, according to the National Wildlife Federation. (Currently around 20% of Home Depot's plants have been treated with neonics and are now labeled as such.)

4. Bees need a water source, especially during dry weather.

Bees like shallow water, which is why experts recommend placing rocks or twigs in a pan of water so that they have something to land on.  This article from The Honey Company shows how to use a chicken waterer, while the bee waterer pictured here sells for less than $5 on Amazon.

5. Steer clear of neonicotinoid pesticides.

The National Wildlife Federation recommends not using products that contain imidacloprid, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, clothianidin or thiamethoxam.

6. Plan for blooms throughout many seasons.

Use this great season-by-season list from Buzz About Bees for suggestions. (The list starts around a third of the way down the page.)

Recent Market Highlights
Market chart icon

- U.S. home prices rose 6.5 percent year-to-year in March, according to a recent S&P/Case-Shiller report.  They rose 6.9 percent year-to-year in April,  according to CoreLogic, a data and analytics company.

- The national average 30-year fixed mortgage rate is in the mid-4-percent range.

The April Pending Home Sales Index decreased 2.1 percent year-to-year, according to the National Association of Realtors®.
Contact Me for Market Information
Are you curious about your home's current market value, or do you have a question about home buying? Just reply to this email, or call me at 206-778-4663.
Links that Make Life Easier

Sometimes real estate-related, sometimes not... these are assorted links that come in handy:

20 Ways Leanne Ford Got Creative With White
White is in, and this gallery shows creative ways it was used by the designer from "Restored By the Fords".

The Merlin Bird Identification App
A free smartphone app from The Cornell Lab that lets you easily identify a bird by appearance or voice.

Gingered Honey Salmon Recipe
A delicious, easy-to-make recipe that can be prepared grilled or broiled.



The Lighter Side

 


This video of a mongoose playing dead (and then not - and then playing dead again) to confuse a curious hornbill is downright hilarious!  Click here or on the image above to watch the video on the family-friendly SunnySkyz website.

Your Resource for Real Estate
I welcome the opportunity to serve you, your friends and associates. Please give me a call today or simply reply to this email if I can be of assistance!

Brooks Beaupain, REALTOR®, ASP, GRI, CNE
Windermere Real Estate/East, Inc.
Brooks@windermere.com | 206-778-4663
www.BrooksBeaupain.com


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Windermere Real Estate/East, Inc. | 3933 Lk Washington Blvd NE, Suite 100 | Kirkland | WA | 98033


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